Vaccines available include the following:

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Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis Vaccination:

Tetanus is an acute disease characterized by muscle rigidity and painful spasms, often starting in the muscles of the jaw and neck. Severe tetanus can lead to respiratory failure and death. Tetanus disease is caused by a neurotoxin produced by anaerobic tetanus bacilli growing in contaminated wounds. Lesions that are considered "tetanus prone" are wounds contaminated with dirt, feces or saliva, deep wounds, burns, crush injuries or those with necrotic tissue. However, tetanus has also been associated with apparently clean superficial wounds, surgical procedures, insect bites, dental infections, chronic sores and infections, and intravenous drug use. Tetanus is a global health problem because C. tetani spores are ubiquitous. The disease occurs almost exclusively in persons who are inadequately immunized and can occur anywhere there are inadequately vaccinated persons.

Diphtheria is an acute bacterial disease transmitted through respiratory droplets and personal contact. Diphtheria affects the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract (respiratory diphtheria), the skin (cutaneous diphtheria), and occasionally other sites (eyes, nose, or vagina). Diphtheria remains a serious disease throughout much of the world. In particular, large outbreaks of diphtheria occurred in the 1990s throughout Russia and the other former Soviet republics. Travelers to disease-endemic areas are at increased risk for exposure to toxigenic strains of C. diphtheriae. Areas with known endemic diphtheria include Africa, Brazil, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Haiti and Paraguay; Asia/South Pacific — Afghanistan, China, India, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam; Middle East — Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Yemen; Europe and other countries.
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Pertussis is a highly communicable respiratory illness characterized by prolonged paroxysmal coughing. Persons in all age groups can be infected. Complications and deaths from pertussis are most common among unvaccinated infants. B. pertussis circulation occurs worldwide. Pertussis Immunity from childhood vaccination, as well as from natural disease, wanes with time so adolescents and adults can become infected or re-infected. Pertussis cases are more frequent in parts of the world where vaccination levels are low.
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Cervical Cancer(Gardasil®):
The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2006, over 9,710 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and 3,700 will die from this disease. The vaccine, Gardasil®, is the first vaccine developed to prevent cervical cancer, precancerous genital lesions, and genital warts due to HPV. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine vaccination for girls 11-12 years of age. The ACIP recommendation also allows for vaccination of girls beginning at nine years old as well as vaccination of girls and women 13-26 years old. Gardasil can prevent cervical cancer.
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Hepatitis A: "Should NOT leave home without it!" Hepatitis A is a viral disease transmitted via contaminated food and water. The Hepatitis A virus can be found worldwide, even in the United States. Countries with high or imminent risk are found in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Central and South America, and Eastern Europe. Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A can affect anyone. In the United States, hepatitis A can occur in situations ranging from isolated cases of disease to widespread epidemics. Good personal hygiene and proper sanitation can help prevent hepatitis A. Vaccines are also available for long-term prevention of hepatitis A virus infection in persons 12 months of age and older. Immune globulin is available for short-term prevention of hepatitis A virus infection in individuals of all ages.
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Hepatitis B: Hepatitis B is a virus transmitted through contact with blood and/or body fluids. Risk for exposure to Hepatitis B is worldwide. Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus, which is called hepatitis B virus (HBV), can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Hepatitis B vaccine is available for all age groups to prevent hepatitis B virus infection.
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Influenza (known commonly as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. Infection with the influenza (the flu) virus can cause illness resulting in mild to severe symptoms with life-threatening complications. An estimated 10-20% of the U.S. population gets the flu each year, with an average of 114,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths. Symptoms include fever (usually high), headache, extreme tiredness, dry cough, sore throat, runny and/or stuffy nose, and muscle aches. The flu virus is spread from person to person through respiratory droplets by coughing or sneezing. It can also happen when touching the hand of someone with these droplets present, and touching your own nose or mouth before washing your hands. The single best way to prevent the flu is through flu vaccination. In spite of rumors to the contrary, getting a flu shot does NOT give you the flu. You may have a sore arm for a day or so, but it will not set you back. And you will have protection against the flu all winter long.
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Japanese Encephalitis (JAE) is also a viral disease spread by rice field breeding mosquitoes from infected animals (usually pigs and wading birds) to humans. Mild infections occur without apparent symptoms other than fever with headache. More severe infection is marked by quick onset, headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, occasional convulsions (especially in infants) and spastic (but rarely flaccid) paralysis Recommendations are made according to your itinerary.
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Meningitis is an infection of the fluid of a person's spinal cord and the fluid that surrounds the brain. People sometimes refer to it as spinal meningitis. Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Knowing whether meningitis is caused by a virus or bacterium is important because the severity of illness and the treatment differ. Viral meningitis is generally less severe and resolves without specific treatment, while bacterial meningitis can be quite severe and may result in brain damage, hearing loss, or learning disability. Some forms of bacterial meningitis are contagious. The meningitis bacteria are spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions (i.e., coughing, kissing). Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as things like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. This disease frequently occurs in large epidemics in developing countries. Overseas travelers should check to see if meningococcal vaccine is recommended for their destination. Meningitis has been endemic in India recently.
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MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases.
Measles virus causes rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever. It can lead to ear infection, pneumonia, seizures (jerking and staring), brain damage, and death.

Mumps virus causes fever, headache, and swollen glands. It can lead to deafness, meningitis (infection of the brain and spinal cord covering), painful swelling of the testicles or ovaries, and, rarely, death.

Rubella (German Measles) virus causes rash, mild fever, and arthritis (mostly in women). If a woman gets rubella while she is pregnant, she could have a miscarriage or her baby could be born with serious birth defects. You or your child could catch these diseases by being around someone who has them. They spread from person to person through the air.

Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine can prevent these diseases. Most children who get their MMR shots will not get these diseases. Many more children would get them if we stopped vaccinating. People should not get MMR vaccines who have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or to a previous dose of MMR vaccine. People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting MMR vaccine. Pregnant women should wait to get MMR vaccine until after they have given birth. Women should avoid getting pregnant for 4 weeks after getting MMR vaccine.
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The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria. Most healthy adults who get the vaccine develop protection to most or all of these types within 2 to 3 weeks of getting the shot. Pneumococcal disease is a serious disease that causes much sickness and death. In fact, pneumococcal disease kills more people in the United States each year than all other vaccine preventable diseases combined. Anyone can get pneumococcal disease. However, some people are at greater risk from the disease. Pneumococcal disease can lead to serious infections of the lungs (pneumonia), the blood (bacteremia), and the covering of the brain (meningitis). About 1 out of every 20 people who get pneumococcal pneumonia dies from it, as do about 2 people out of 10 who get bacteremia and 3 people out of 10 who get meningitis. People with the special health problems mentioned above are even more likely to die from the disease. Drugs such as penicillin were once effective in treating these infections; but the disease has become more resistant to these drugs, making treatment of pneumococcal infections more difficult. This makes prevention of the disease through vaccination even more important.
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Rabies is a serious disease. It is caused by a virus. Rabies is mainly a disease of animals. Humans get rabies when they are bitten by infected animals. At first there might not be any symptoms. But weeks, or even years after a bite, rabies can cause pain, fatigue, headaches, fever, and irritability. These are followed by seizures, hallucinations, and paralysis. Rabies is almost always fatal. Wild animals - especially bats - are the most common source of human rabies infection in the United States. Skunks, raccoons, dogs, and cats can also transmit the disease. Rabies vaccine is given to people at high risk of rabies to protect them if they are exposed. It can also prevent the disease if it is given to a person after they have been exposed. Rabies vaccine is made from killed rabies virus. It cannot cause rabies. People at high risk of exposure to rabies, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, rabies laboratory workers, spelunkers, and rabies biologics production workers should be offered rabies vaccine. The vaccine should also be considered for: People whose activities bring them into frequent contact with rabies virus or with possibly rabid animals. International travelers who are likely to come in contact with animals in parts of the world where rabies is common. The pre-exposure schedule for rabies vaccination is 3 doses. Anyone who has been bitten by an animal, or who otherwise may have been exposed to rabies, should see a doctor immediately Many developing countries do not have animal vaccination programs and some do not have access to the treatment, Therefore, rabies vaccine pre-exposure may be recommended.
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Yellow Fever
Each Passport Health location is yellow fever certified by the State Department of Health. Yellow fever vaccination proof is required for entry to many countries such as India and Brazil. Yellow fever is a viral disease transmitted between humans by a mosquito. Most countries have regulations and requirements for yellow fever vaccination that must be met prior to entering the country. General precautions to avoid mosquito bites should be followed. Passport Health provides insect repellent, protective clothing, and mosquito netting to help avoid yellow fever infection. Yellow fever vaccine is a live virus vaccine which has been used for several decades. A single dose confers immunity lasting 10 years or more. If a person is at continued risk of yellow fever infection, a booster dose is needed every 10 years.
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Twinrix is a vaccine developed to treat both Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B at the same time. Immune Globulin (IG): IG is used for infants below the recommended minimum age for Hepatitis A vaccine.
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Typhoid Fever Vaccination
Typhoid fever is an acute, life-threatening febrile illness caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica Typhi. An estimated 22 million cases of typhoid fever and 200,000 related deaths occur worldwide each year. Approximately 400 cases of typhoid fever, mostly among travelers, are reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention each year. CDC recommends it for travelers to areas where there is a recognized risk of exposure. Typhoid risk is greatest for travelers to the Indian Subcontinent and other developing countries in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Travelers who are visiting relatives or friends and who may be less likely to eat only safe foods (cooked and served hot) and beverages (carbonated beverages or those made from water that has been boiled) are at greater risk. Typhoid Vaccination is particularly recommended for those who will be traveling in smaller cities, villages, and rural areas off the usual tourist itineraries, where food and beverage choices may be more limited. Travelers have acquired typhoid fever even during brief visits of <1 week to countries where the disease is endemic.
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Varicella (Chickenpox)
Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. Varicella, or chickenpox, is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in young infants and adults. It causes a rash, itching, fever, and tiredness. It can lead to severe skin infection, scars, pneumonia, brain damage, or death. The chickenpox virus can be spread from person to person through the air, or by contact with fluid from chickenpox blisters. A person who has had chickenpox can get a painful rash called shingles years later. Before the varicella vaccine, about 11,000 people were hospitalized for chickenpox each year in the United States.

Most people who get chickenpox vaccine will not get chickenpox. But if someone who has been vaccinated does get chickenpox, it is usually very mild. They will have fewer spots, are less likely to have a fever, and will recover faster. All international travelers should verify they have had a varicella vaccination to reduce the risk of contracting chickenpox.
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Zostavax(Shingles)
A vaccine for shingles was licensed in 2006. In clinical trials, the vaccine prevented shingles in about half of people 60 years of age and older. It can also reduce the pain associated with shingles. Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters. It is also called Herpes Zoster. A shingles rash usually appears on one side of the face or body and lasts from 2 to 4 weeks. Its main symptom is pain, which can be quite severe. Other symptoms of shingles can include fever, headache, chills and upset stomach. Very rarely, a shingles infection can lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, brain inflammation (encephalitis) or death. Shingles is caused by the Varicella Zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. Only someone who has had a case of chickenpox – or gotten chickenpox vaccine – can get shingles. The virus stays in your body. It can reappear many years later to cause a case of shingles. You can’t catch shingles from another person with shingles. However, a person who has never had chickenpox (or chickenpox vaccine) could get chickenpox from someone with shingles. This is not very common. Shingles is far more common in people 50 and older than in younger people. A single dose of shingles vaccine is indicated for adults 60 years of age and older. At least 1 million people a year in the United States get shingles.
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